?

Log in

No account? Create an account

Previous Entry | Next Entry

Ada Lovelace Day: The women who tell all

I've already made one and a bit Ada Lovelace Day posts over at our IT Pro blog, but this one isn't really for that audience. For one thing, it's partially about two of our editors there.

In one post I talked about women as the invisible heart of technology, and there's more than one way that that happens. You'll pick up a technology magazine or open a tech-oriented web site, and you'll miss all the women who helped put it together. Women like Maggie Holland and Nicole Kobie who edit IT Pro, like my wife Mary Branscombe (marypcb) who edits IT Expert and writes for so many titles she has to put a list on the back of her business card, like Kay Ewbank, like Ina Fried, like Mary-Jo Foley, like Hermione Way, like so many women in so many places who write about so many different pieces of technology. I meet them in press rooms, at events, online and offline. They're my colleagues and my compatriots.

They're only part of the story. The other side is the world of tech PR. Look through my Twitter followers and you'll find people from most of the UK's technology PR companies - and most of them are women. They're the people who write the press releases that inspire stories, who find people to answer queries at all times of day or night or place in the world. They even manage put up with writers who grumpily answer the phone when they're on deadline, or who forget to call back or email when they said they would... They work in companies, like Anne Finnie at HP, or for agencies, like the folk at 6Degrees and Axicom and Text100 and Waggoner Edstrom and, well the list just goes on and on.

Then there are the conference organisers, the folk who handle planning the events that are such an important part of my day-to-day work. They produce programmes, book sites, manage speakers - all from behind the scenes. They're the folk who keep things running smoothly, when all around them is chaos.

It's hard to put names to everyone, but they're there. I talked about women in technology as its invisible heart. Maybe the women of the press, of PR, and of conferences, are the invisible backbone of technology.