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Fossils in the architecture

This morning I found my self walking outside the Economist's London offices. They're in an attractive square with a dynamic water feature, just off Piccadily near Green Park. What's more, the buildings and the steps are constructed using Portland stone.

This means they're also full of fossils - including some quite impressive death assemblages.

So it's time for a quick round of camera phone shots...

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This morning I found my self walking outside the Economist's London offices. They're in an attractive square with a dynamic water feature, just off Piccadily near Green Park. What's more, the buildings and the steps are constructed using <a href="http://web.ukonline.co.uk/conker/fossils/portland.htm">Portland stone</a>.

This means they're also full of fossils - including some quite impressive death assemblages.

<lj-cut text="So it's time for a quick round of camera phone shots...">So it's time for a quick round of camera phone shots...

<img src="http://www.sandm.co.uk/~simon/images/portlandfossil1.jpg"">

<img src="http://www.sandm.co.uk/~simon/images/portlandfossil2.jpg"">

Note the famous "Portland screw" - casts of long thin gastropods. The shells are long gone, but the shape remains in the stone...

Comments

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almeda
Jul. 22nd, 2004 10:22 am (UTC)
My mom taught Earth Science at Northeastern Illinois University for a while, and used the sides of buildings in downtown Chicago as gorgeous polished specimens of rock from all over the world, vertical and ready for viewing. :-> She wrote up one such field trip as a self-guided illustrated walking tour.
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